May 18, 2024

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Free For All Food

35 North, Farragut’s first food truck park and bar, opens for business

FARRAGUT



a man standing in front of a bus: Food trucks Penne For Your Thoughts and Big O’s Famous BBQ provided evening food service during the grand opening of 35 North food truck park and bar in Farragut on Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2020. The food truck bay can house up to three trucks with electrical connections.


© Saul Young/News Sentinel
Food trucks Penne For Your Thoughts and Big O’s Famous BBQ provided evening food service during the grand opening of 35 North food truck park and bar in Farragut on Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2020. The food truck bay can house up to three trucks with electrical connections.

35 North, Farragut’s first food truck park and bar, opens for business

Saul Young, Brenna McDermott

Farragut’s first food truck park held its grand opening on Tuesday, Dec. 29, to great anticipation and large crowds.

35 North food truck park and bar, at 11321 Kingston Pike, stayed busy throughout the day. Vehicles circled the parking lot looking for an open space, with much of the parking spilling over to nearby businesses.

“It’s been steady all day and that’s what we want,” said co-owner Carlos Cortez. Cortez and business partner Doug Justus redeveloped Admiral’s Corner, the retail complex that houses 35 North, its first tenant. 

The partners acquired the property in November 2018 and knew they wanted to create a place where they could take their own kids after a ballgame, said Cortez, who moved to Knoxville in 2008 and works at Discovery.  

“This feels like something you would find in a big city,” Justus said. “There’s a surprise when people come out to see the space.” 

35 North has 7,000 square feet of indoor space and an additional 2,000-square-foot courtyard with outdoor seating. 

The indoor portion of 35 North comprises three areas: a rotunda with a bar, a middle portion with restaurant booths and table seating, and a third room with a large garage door connecting to the courtyard. 

Three food trucks can fit into the bays where customers order their food, which is delivered to their tables by the wait staff. Food trucks serving at dinner were Penne for Your Thoughts and Big O’s Famous BBQ. Set up inside in a food booth was Blackie Chan’s Sushi, owned by sushi chef Christopher Richard, who has plans for a food truck by February. 

The bar offers a variety of craft beers from popular local breweries like Orange Hat and Schulz Brau among national brands like Wicked Weed or Sierra Nevada. 35 North also boasts a large selection of whiskeys, bourbons, and liquors. 



a person standing in front of a store: The bar at 35 North on Tuesday, December 29, 2020.


© Saul Young/News Sentinel
The bar at 35 North on Tuesday, December 29, 2020.

Parking is behind the building, and guests also can park at the medical clinic lot next door.

Farragut Planning Commission discussed the redevelopment of the old Phillips 66, located at the corner of N. Campbell Station Road, in summer 2019.

It’s part of Farragut Town Center, which has seen improvements in recent years with the addition of a Starbucks and the completion of Mayor Ralph McGill Plaza park, located across the street from 35 North.

Farragut does not allow food trucks in public areas, except for during special events. 

35 North will be open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Hours will be extended to midnight Fridays and Saturdays when COVID-19 curfews are lifted.

Keep up with the business on Facebook by searching 35 North-Farragut. 



a group of people sitting at a table: Song and Greg Alford at the grand opening of 35 North food truck park and bar in Farragut on Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2020.


© Saul Young/News Sentinel
Song and Greg Alford at the grand opening of 35 North food truck park and bar in Farragut on Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2020.

Among the diners were Greg and Song Alford. Greg, who is originally from Farragut, moved back this June with his wife, Song, after 25 years in Scottsdale, Arizona.

“It’s a nice bar,” said Greg, “with different drinks to choose from and your choice of food. The atmosphere is great.”

“There are a lot of places like this in Scottsdale,” said Song. “We needed a place like this (in Farragut).”

OPINION

Priorities change from one year to the next

Leslie Snow, Shopper News

I remember spending a lot of time thinking about my hair. I wanted to try a shorter cut, but I didn’t want to give up my ponytail. It seemed very important at the time. I spent a couple weeks doing internet searches for “updated bobs” and “best cuts for women over 50.” In the end, I just let it grow.

And then there was the rug for my kitchen. That was a big worry a year ago. I wanted to find a washable rug because the kitchen gets so much foot traffic, but I needed something that would blend in with my eclectic furniture, too. It was stressful trying to find just the right thing.

I thought about my pores, too. I saw some commercial about a skin cream that promised to “reduce the size of aging pores.” It really got me thinking. Should I be exfoliating more? Does retinol really work? Is vitamin C the answer? So many questions. I tried a new skin care regimen, but I gave it up after a month or two. It just didn’t seem that important anymore.

For a while, I fixated on filling a set of picture frames and hanging them on the wall going up the staircase. Should the photos be black and white or color?  Should I take new pictures or mix in some old ones too? Those seemed like big decisions, back then, but they weren’t the only ones.

I stressed about the sprinkler system in the front beds, the mess in my closet, the paint color in the guest bedroom and the stain for our back deck.

I wanted a new sectional for the basement, a stone heron for the patio, a float pad to use in the lake, and some new towels for the bathrooms. I even spent a week looking for a new chair in my office, something with wheels that swiveled so I could move around more easily.

In 2019, if you had asked me about any of those things, I would have told you why they were important. I could have recounted a dozen reasons why my pores needed shrinking, my ponytail was vital, and my rug was life-changing.

Then my sister got sick and never recovered. The coronavirus became the lead news story, and like most of us, I retreated to my home to ride out the storm. So many things changed in such a short period of time. And all the things I thought were so important a year ago seem trivial now.

I don’t spend any time thinking about my hair these days. I seldom wear makeup and I don’t give my pores a single thought. I have a rug I can throw into the wash, but it hasn’t changed my life at all. Old towels work just as well as new ones, and the guest bedroom paint looks just fine.

But I wonder what comes next. I wonder where I’ll be when the coronavirus vaccine is commonplace and I can go back to my normal life. Will I wear makeup again? Will I spend time worrying about my sprinkler?  Will I do internet searches to find the perfect stain color? I’m not so sure. I don’t know which changes are permanent and which ones are fleeting. 

I have a perspective now that I didn’t have in 2019. My priorities have changed. And while I’m glad to have said goodbye to 2020, I hope I can stay focused on the things that matter most in 2021.

Leslie Snow may be reached at snow [email protected].

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This article originally appeared on Knoxville News Sentinel: Shopper News blog: 35 North, Farragut’s first food truck park and bar, opens for business

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